Food Literacy: Perceptions of Young Canadian Adults

By Sarah Colatruglio and Joyce Slater.

Published by Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: August 28, 2015 $US5.00

The purpose of this qualitative, grounded theory study was to explore the concept of food literacy from the perspective of young Canadian adults who recently transitioned to independent living. Seventeen individual, in-depth interviews were conducted with Canadian university students. Results suggest that while young adults value “healthy” eating, they are at risk for leaving their family homes lacking the necessary food literacy required to make healthy food choices, sustain healthy food relationships, and be well within complex food environments. Findings indicate that young adults could potentially benefit from expanding their views on food and health. This paper adds value to the existing literature by exploring the components of food literacy and connections to well-being from the perceptions of young Canadian adults.

Keywords: Food Literacy, Health, Food Skills, Cooking, Nutrition, Young Adults

Food Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2015, pp.71-87. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: August 28, 2015 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 563.515KB)).

Sarah Colatruglio

Graduate Student, Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Dr. Joyce Slater

Assistant Professor, Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada